Eudora News and Informationwww.eudorareporter.com

UPDATE 10:25PM

The National Weather service has cancelled the tornado warning effective immediately.  A severe thunderstorm warning is still in effect.

UPDATE: 10:22 PM

Tornado sirens have been sounded in Eudora.

UPDATE: 10:19 PM

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN TOPEKA HAS ISSUED A  TORNADO WARNING FOR… SOUTHERN DOUGLAS COUNTY IN EAST CENTRAL KANSAS UNTIL 1030 PM CST

* AT 1007 PM CST… NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WITH STRONG ROTATION CAPABLE OF PRODUCING A TORNADO. THIS SEVERE STORM WAS LOCATED NEAR GLOBE… OR 11 MILES NORTHWEST OF OTTAWA… MOVING NORTHEAST AT 80 MPH.

* LOCATIONS IMPACTED INCLUDE… PLEASANT GROVE… BALDWIN CITY… VINLAND…

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

FOR YOUR SAFETY… GO TO A STORM SHELTER OR BASEMENT NOW!

STAY TUNED TO WEATHER RADIO OR LOCAL MEDIA OUTLETS FOR THE LATEST SEVERE WEATHER INFORMATION.

The National Weather Service has issued a tornado watch until 1AM for Douglas County. The watch includes 14 other counties west and south of Eudora.

Anderson, Coffey, Franklin, Lyon, Osage, Shawnee, Wabaunsee, Brown, Jackson, Jefferson, Marshall, Nemaha, Pottawatomie and Riley Counties are in the watch box.

A tornado watch means conditions are right for tornado’s to form, but an actual tornado has not been spotted.

As of 9:10 PM a long line of moderate to strong storms were located just west of Topeka from Holton all the way south into Oklahoma.

We will continue to monitor the storms as it is expected to roll through our area during the overnight hours and bring you word of any updates.

 

 

 

 

Print Friendly
Share

8 Responses to Tornado Watch in effect until 1AM

  • I liked it better when Douglas County wouldn’t blow the sirens unless a spotter physically spotted a tornado (or funnel) .. this business of blowing sirens solely based on radar-indicated rotation is ruining the credibility of the tornado siren.

  • The sirens at West Elementary didn’t go off.

  • @thebcman – tell that to the people of Harveyville that had no tornado warning.

  • @Not A Native: You’re missing the point. Blowing the sirens here on a storm down by Baldwin with very weak rotation was silly. The more times the sirens are blown needlessly desensitizes the public — and they won’t take the siren seriously when they actually need to . Needs to be different sirens for storms that just have radar-indicated rotation versus a storm that has a tornado on the ground.

  • @thebcman, The warnings are issued for the safety of the public by the NWS. It is a personal choice to take cover, it is not mandatory. In regard to making the sirens more selective, that is an issue you should take up with Douglas county. From what I understand, there are counties that have that capability, but it does come at a price. As a survivor of a F5 tornado, I take every severe storm very seriously. Does that mean I live in fear and always head for cover? No, I do not, but I respect those that understand severe storms and heed their message. Did I know that the storm was in Baldwin, yes I did. Did I take cover, no I did not. But I made an informed decision based on what the weather professionals were saying. In my opinion, it is always better to be safe than sorry when it comes to severe weather. If the public is notified of the warning, and they choose not to take cover and something does happen, they have no one to blame but themselves. Living in Kansas and dealing with severe weather is something no one should not take seriously at any time.

  • I guess I just blame technology. I grew up in Arkansas City in the 70’s – early 80’s (before the advent of the Doppler Radar). Back then, if they blew the sirens, it meant a tornado was on the ground, headed for town .. and you needed to take cover.

    I respect those times.

    These days, every little storm that gets some meteorologist’s panties in a wad gets a warning put on it. If I hear the sirens, I want it to be a real emergency, not a radar-indicated fantasy.

  • An issue that is not being brought up is warning time. Waiting until someone spots the issue can be much to late. By sounding a warning when there is a strong chance of a tornado forming allows people to be in a shelter when and if it does occur. Saying that warnings should not be issued is is reckless. Saying that it will desensitizes people to a real waring is like saying a tornado drill or fire drill will do the same. I would rather have the chance to have my family in a shelter needlessly than waiting for a “spotter” that may or may not be there to spot. Better safe than sorry, if anything consider it a good drill for the most common natural disaster the occurs in the state. I will now get off my soapbox.

  • Interesting article about the Harveyville tornado and it’s lack of warning ..

    http://www.kansas.com/2012/03/02/2239323/harveyville-tornado-struck-without.html